Frequently Asked Questions

Whilst we're happy to answer any questions you may have regarding the legalisation, or attestation, of documents for use overseas, here you'll find some of the questions that are regularly asked (and answered)...

What’s an Apostille?
Which countries accept an Apostille Stamp?
What’s the difference between Attestation and Legalisation?
Why is it necessary to have documents Attested or Legalised?
Which documents can you Legalise?
What are the steps involved in the Attestation and Legalisation of documents?
Is the Legalisation process the same for all kind of documents?
My document needs to be translated before/after being legalised, can you do that?
Can photocopies be legalised?
Can I use my own solicitor to certify my document?
Why would the FCO reject a document?
What if my certificates are laminated?
Are supporting documents such as Passports or ID cards required in order to get my documents legalised?
How do you ensure safety of my documents?
How can I start a legalisation order?
What are the available payment methods?
Where do I need to send my documents?
Can you collect the document from my address?
How long does it take for the document to arrive back to me?
Are the timescales offered guaranteed?


What’s an Apostille?

An Apostille stamp is a form of authentication added to documents to allow them to be used in member countries of the Hague Convention. Apostilles are usually requested by foreign authorities and organisations in order to accept a document as genuine and so they can be used for official purposes abroad.

Once an Apostille stamp is added to a document, it becomes valid for use within the Hague Convention member countries. An Apostille Stamp is also known as an FCO Apostille, as the FCO (Foreign & Commonwealth Office) is the governmental body that issues them within the UK.

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Which countries accept an Apostille Stamp?

Member countries of the Hague Convention (established in 1961) will recognise and issue Apostilles for the international legalisation of documents. Follow this link for a full list of more than 70 member countries of the Hague Convention.

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What’s the difference between Attestation and Legalisation?

These terms are used mutually to mean the same thing. Essentially this is the process of validating documents by one country to be used in another. For countries that are not part of the Hague Convention, this will need to be carried out by representatives of multiple countries on the same document, usually the country of issue and the country where the document is being presented.

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Why is it necessary to have documents Attested or Legalised?

Legalisation of a document is typically required where there is a need to present an official document or certificate to a country other than the one that issued the document.

The purpose of this process is so that your UK documents will be recognised and accepted overseas. This would include applying for a Visa, Drivers Licence, Passport, Medical Registration etc outside of the UK.

This process is not usually needed if you are applying to an overseas British authority such as a British embassy or High Commission, for example when applying for a replacement passport to your own embassy. If in doubt you should check the requirements with whoever you need to present the document to.

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Which documents can you Legalise?

Our service will allow you to legalise, or attest, any UK-Issued document for use outside the UK. We can also carry out the process for documents issued in Ireland or British Overseas Territories such as the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands or Bermuda. Additionally we can legalise documents issued within a British Crown Dependancy (Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney and the Isle of Man). Check our Documents we can Legalise page for more information on the document types we can process.

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What are the steps involved in the Attestation and Legalisation of documents?

Although the process may vary depending on the country you need to have your documents prepared for, or the kind of documents you are processing, the Attestation and Legalisation process usually includes: the certification of the document by a solicitor/Notary Public, the addition of an FCO Apostille, and further Consular Legalisation by the country where the document will need to be used.

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Is the Legalisation process the same for all kind of documents?

The legalisation of documents will not only vary depending on the country you need them processed for, but also on the kind of papers you need to have legalised. For example, documents such as birth or marriage certificates will not require certification, whereas passports or educational ones usually will. Commercial documents are also treated differently. If you need some help when classifying your document in a category in order to place an order, do not hesitate to get in touch.

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My document needs to be translated before/after being legalised, can you do that?

If your document needs translation before or after the legalisation process, we can also handle that for you. You can have your document translated into over 170 different languages by our professional translators, who always work in their mother tongue.

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Can photocopies be legalised?

In most cases we will require the original document to legalise it. For documents such as educational certificates and commercial documents, we will usually then certify the original and carry out legalisation on the certified copy. In most cases, we can carry out legalisation on the original if this is preferred, but please note that this is not a legal requirement. 

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Can I use my own solicitor to certify my document?

You can, but some issues may occur. For example, delays can be experienced if your solicitor’s signature isn’t held on the FCO’s database of recognised sample signatures. In cases such as these, the FCO will ask your solicitor to send a copy of their signature so they can add it to their database, which naturally leads to a delay in processing. Our solicitor’s signature is stored at the FCO’s system so the FCO recognises their signature and the legalisation process can go forward without delay.

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Why would the FCO reject a document?

There are some reasons why the Foreign and Commonwealth Office would not stamp a document. These include:

  1. It’s a foreign document. As a UK-body, the FCO will only stamp UK-issued documents.
  2. The Educational Institution that produced a qualification isn’t an officially recognised body. Please see our Educational Certificates page for more details on how to verify whether your issuer is accepted.
  3. Registrar/Solicitor/Signatory is not registered within the FCO’s database. If that’s the case, further steps will be needed to obtain a sample signature before the document can be validated.

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What if my certificates are laminated?

Certificates produced by governmental bodies such as Birth, Marriage or Death Certificates, Decree Absolutes, Wills etc cannot be legalised if they have been laminated. In this case, we would need have an new copy reproduced so the work is carried out on that one instead.

In the case of Educational Certificates, or any document that requires certification by a solicitor, certified copies will be always be produced and the work will be done on those copies so your original document remains clean. As such, lamination will not prevent us from legalising your document(s). 

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Are supporting documents such as Passports or ID cards required in order to get my documents legalised?

In most cases, we do not require identification documents to be able to legalise your documents. This is because we are validating the document, not the person. There are some circumstances where a photocopy of your passport may be required, for example when legalising documents for use in Saudi Arabia. If this applies to you, we will contact you to arrange this.

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How do you ensure safety of my documents?

Vital Legalisation consists of a team of specialists. You can be assured that your documents are treated with care, attention to detail, and a consistent, professional manner. For any document held within our offices during the legalisation process, for example when we are legalising a copy of an original document, your original documents are stored safely to prevent damage or loss. 

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How can I start a legalisation order?

You can place your order directly on our website, following the process from the Order Online page and selecting the country you want to order legalisation for. Alternatively, one of our Expert Advisors can also arrange your order over the phone.

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What are the available payment methods?

You can pay for your order with a Visa, Maestro or American Express Debit/Credit card, though PayPal, Bank Transfer (EFT/BACS) or by Cheque.

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Where do I need to send my documents?

The office you need to send your documents to will depend on the speed of service you are going for.

Note: Please do not send anything to us without a confirmed order reference number. This will be provided to you at the time of your order either online or over the phone. 

For either STANDARD and EXPRESS orders, please send your document(s) to our Head Office in West Yorkshire:

Vital Certificates Ltd
381 Bradford Road
Batley
West Yorkshire
WF17 5PH
United Kingdom

For URGENT orders ONLY, please send your document(s) to our London processing centre:

Vital Certificates Ltd
Innovation Warehouse
1st Floor
1 E Poultry Ave
London
EC1A 9PT
United Kingdom

Please be aware that documents sent to the incorrect office will lead to a delay whilst we arrange to transfer your document(s) to the correct office. 

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Can you collect the document from my address?

Yes. We can arrange for the collection of your document(s) from any address around the world if you need it. If you would like this option to be added to your order, simply choose the collection option during checkout. You will be required to print out a shipping label to give to the courier upon collection, and we will email you a link to our courier to arrange the collection for a time convenient to yourself. Full details will be provided once your order has been placed.

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How long does it take for the document to arrive back to me?

The time taken to complete your work will depend on the speed of service you have chosen (Standard, Express or Urgent), as well as the time required to ship the document to and from our offices in the UK. Please add in sufficient time for shipping when choosing your service speed. As a general rule, UK shipping is overnight, whilst overseas deliveries will take longer. Here are some standard courier shipping times to and from the UK:

  • Western Europe: 1-2 Working Days
  • Eastern Europe: 2-4 Working Days
  • Middle East: 2-3 Working Days
  • Far East & Australasia: 3-6 Working Days
  • US & Canada: 1-3 Working Days
  • South America: 3-6 Working Days

For an accurate delivery time, please contact us.

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Are the timescales offered guaranteed?

We always process documents as soon as we receive them and do whatever is possible to meet the required timescales. Please bear in mind however that we are dealing with government offices and delays can occur either at the FCO or at the Embassy. These delays are very rare, and whilst out of our control, we would inform you as soon as we are made aware to allow you to plan accordingly.

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Questions about attestation